Janet`s letter to the Community

Ok – so we’ve had some very unusual weather these last few weeks.  Very hot.  Very dry.  Sudden massive downpours.  Well – that’s Britain for you!  And yes, some of it has been rather uncomfortable.  But overall this experience has made me realise how overwhelmingly fortunate I am.  

When it’s hot, I can sit in front of a fan.  When it rains I might get wet, but I can get inside and get warm and dry.  Some foods may be a bit more expensive due to poor harvests – but I won’t starve.  I have enough to eat, and no prospect of not being able to afford a decent diet.  This is, of course, not the case for many millions of people across the world.  For them, lack of rain, or rain at the wrong time, risks hunger and sometimes starvation.  For others, lack of shelter creates danger as well as discomfort.  We are so very fortunate.

So – as we approach our annual Harvest Thanksgiving on 30th September, let us do so with real thankfulness in our hearts, and a spirit of generosity towards those who are less fortunate.  As before, we will be making donations to the Foodbank, in recognition that there are people in great need on our doorsteps as well as far away.  We will be following our service with a “bring and share lunch”, a further opportunity to rejoice in God’s goodness together as we share in his bounty.  Do come and join us.  And enjoy the blessings that God has showered on you!

P.S.  I’ve mentioned this before but there’s no harm in repeating it:  when giving donations to the Food Bank, or to any other food collection programme, please make sure you check the list of useful goods, and check the expiry dates, making sure that there’s at least three months still to go.  Out-of-date food cannot be used and it sometimes takes a little while to be distributed.  People in desperate situations don’t need food poisoning on top of everything else.

With every blessing,

Janet


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Janet`s June letter to the Community
Janet`s June letter to the Community

Janet`s May letter to the Community
Janet`s May letter to the Community

Janet`s April 2016 letter to the Community
Janet`s April 2016 letter to the Community

Janet`s March letter to the Community
Janet`s March letter to the Community

Janet`s February 2016 letter to the Community
Janet`s February 2016 letter to the Community

Janet`s January 2016 letter to the Community
Janet`s January 2016 letter to the Community

Janet`s December 2015 letter to the Community
Janet`s December 2015 letter to the Community

Janet`s November letter to the Community
Janet`s November letter to the CommunityI’m writing this on the centenary of the death of Edith Cavell. You will probably be reading it as we approach our annual Ceremony of Remembrance for members of our armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Edith Cavell was a British nurse who had been working in Belgium for some time before the outbreak of the First World War, remained to help organise the nursing of the wounded, both military and civilians, and was executed by the Germans for helping Allied soldiers and military-age Belgians to escape into neutral Holland. Her network had almost certainly been involved in espionage, but she had treated both Allied and German patients with impartiality. Her execution caused outrage, both because of her profession and because she was a woman. She was not quite 50 years old. Many of those whose deaths we commemorate on Remembrance Sunday were much younger, with all of their lives before them. Again and again on these occasions, I feel an enormous sadness for the waste of it all. How much potential has been destroyed in the last century, in supposedly “civilised” countries? How many superb surgeons, dedicated politicians, skilled carpenters and mechanics, and caring husbands and fathers (they have, after all, almost all been men) have never come into being because they lost their lives in conflicts that they didn’t really understand and were powerless to prevent? It is salutary to reflect on how much better today’s society might be had we been able to benefit from the mature contributions of those whose lives were cut short. So we honour those who died in combat, and grieve for the waste of their lives and the devastation inflicted on their families. But let us also remember that those of us who remain have a responsibility to do what we can to make a better place of the world we live in. Edith Cavell was playing her part. What can you do today to live in peace, and to spread peace to those around you? I’m writing this on the centenary of the death of Edith Cavell. You will probably be reading it as we approach our annual Ceremony of Remembrance for members of our armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Edith Cavell was a British nurse who had been working in Belgium for some time before the outbreak of the First World War, remained to help organise the nursing of the wounded, both military and civilians, and was executed by the Germans for helping Allied soldiers and military-age Belgians to escape into neutral Holland. Her network had almost certainly been involved in espionage, but she had treated both Allied and German patients with impartiality. Her execution caused outrage, both because of her profession and because she was a woman. She was not quite 50 years old. Many of those whose deaths we commemorate on Remembrance Sunday were much younger, with all of their lives before them. Again and again on these occasions, I feel an enormous sadness for the waste of it all. How much potential has been destroyed in the last century, in supposedly “civilised” countries? How many superb surgeons, dedicated politicians, skilled carpenters and mechanics, and caring husbands and fathers (they have, after all, almost all been men) have never come into being because they lost their lives in conflicts that they didn’t really understand and were powerless to prevent? It is salutary to reflect on how much better today’s society might be had we been able to benefit from the mature contributions of those whose lives were cut short. So we honour those who died in combat, and grieve for the waste of their lives and the devastation inflicted on their families. But let us also remember that those of us who remain have a responsibility to do what we can to make a better place of the world we live in. Edith Cavell was playing her part. What can you do today to live in peace, and to spread peace to those around you? I’m writing this on the centenary of the death of Edith Cavell. You will probably be reading it as we approach our annual Ceremony of Remembrance for members of our armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Edith Cavell was a British nurse who had been working in Belgium for some time before the outbreak of the First World War, remained to help organise the nursing of the wounded, both military and civilians, and was executed by the Germans for helping Allied soldiers and military-age Belgians to escape into neutral Holland. Her network had almost certainly been involved in espionage, but she had treated both Allied and German patients with impartiality. Her execution caused outrage, both because of her profession and because she was a woman. She was not quite 50 years old. Many of those whose deaths we commemorate on Remembrance Sunday were much younger, with all of their lives before them. Again and again on these occasions, I feel an enormous sadness for the waste of it all. How much potential has been destroyed in the last century, in supposedly “civilised” countries? How many superb surgeons, dedicated politicians, skilled carpenters and mechanics, and caring husbands and fathers (they have, after all, almost all been men) have never come into being because they lost their lives in conflicts that they didn’t really understand and were powerless to prevent? It is salutary to reflect on how much better today’s society might be had we been able to benefit from the mature contributions of those whose lives were cut short. So we honour those who died in combat, and grieve for the waste of their lives and the devastation inflicted on their families. But let us also remember that those of us who remain have a responsibility to do what we can to make a better place of the world we live in. Edith Cavell was playing her part. What can you do today to live in peace, and to spread peace to those around you? I’m writing this on the centenary of the death of Edith Cavell. You will probably be reading it as we approach our annual Ceremony of Remembrance for members of our armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Edith Cavell was a British nurse who had been working in Belgium for some time before the outbreak of the First World War, remained to help organise the nursing of the wounded, both military and civilians, and was executed by the Germans for helping Allied soldiers and military-age Belgians to escape into neutral Holland. Her network had almost certainly been involved in espionage, but she had treated both Allied and German patients with impartiality. Her execution caused outrage, both because of her profession and because she was a woman. She was not quite 50 years old. Many of those whose deaths we commemorate on Remembrance Sunday were much younger, with all of their lives before them. Again and again on these occasions, I feel an enormous sadness for the waste of it all. How much potential has been destroyed in the last century, in supposedly “civilised” countries? How many superb surgeons, dedicated politicians, skilled carpenters and mechanics, and caring husbands and fathers (they have, after all, almost all been men) have never come into being because they lost their lives in conflicts that they didn’t really understand and were powerless to prevent? It is salutary to reflect on how much better today’s society might be had we been able to benefit from the mature contributions of those whose lives were cut short. So we honour those who died in combat, and grieve for the waste of their lives and the devastation inflicted on their families. But let us also remember that those of us who remain have a responsibility to do what we can to make a better place of the world we live in. Edith Cavell was playing her part. What can you do today to live in peace, and to spread peace to those around you?

Janet`s October letter to the Community
Janet`s October letter to the Community

Janet`s September letter to the Community
Janet`s September 2015 letter to the Community

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